SMITHSONIAN NATIONAL MUSEUM OF AFRICAN ART ACQUIRES: ADEBUNMI GBADEBO'S I SANG THE BLUES BLACKER: 9 HOLES

The National Museum of African Art (NMAfA) began as a private educational institution in 1964 to promote cross-cultural understanding in the social sciences and arts. Founded by Warren M. Robbins, a former U.S. Foreign Service officer, it was known as the Museum of African Art and located on Capitol Hill in a townhouse that had been the home of Frederick Douglass, the African American abolitionist, and statesman. In August 1979 the museum became part of the Smithsonian Institution, the world’s largest museum and research complex dedicated to the increase and diffusion of knowledge.

Warren Robbins’ inaugural vision—to teach visitors how to look at African art in the interest of promoting cross-cultural communication—remains at the heart of the National Museum of African Art’s mission today. Indeed, the museum will remain relevant to its diverse audiences and African constituents as it continues to pro

The National Museum of African Art (NMAfA) began as a private educational institution in 1964 to promote cross-cultural understanding in the social sciences and arts. Founded by Warren M. Robbins, a former U.S. Foreign Service officer, it was known as the Museum of African Art and located on Capitol Hill in a townhouse that had been the home of Frederick Douglass, the African American abolitionist, and statesman. In August 1979 the museum became part of the Smithsonian Institution, the world’s largest museum and research complex dedicated to the increase and diffusion of knowledge.

Warren Robbins’ inaugural vision—to teach visitors how to look at African art in the interest of promoting cross-cultural communication—remains at the heart of the National Museum of African Art’s mission today. Indeed, the museum will remain relevant to its diverse audiences and African constituents as it continues to promote and represent the rich artistic practices of Africa.

A Dilemma of Inheritance: Adebunmi Gbadebo Employs Abstraction and Non-Traditional Materials to Mine Memories and Histories of Enslavement

https://www.culturetype.com/2020/10/03/a-dilemma-of-inheritance-adebunmi-gbadebo-employs-abstraction-and-non-traditional-materials-to-mine-memories-and-histories-of-enslavement/

Mapping Black Identities
Installation views of the exhibition “Mapping Black Identities”. Thursday, February 21, 2019 – Monday, July 20, 2020. Galleries 373 and 374, Modern and Contemporary Galleries, Minneapolis Institute of Art. Organized by Minneapolis Institute of Art. Photo © 2020 Minneapolis Institute of Art

URL new.artsmia.org/exhibition/mapping-black-identities/

My work was mentioned as a standout at the Dhaka Art Summit in the Sydney Morning Herald written by John McDonald, Art Critic and Historian. Check out the article in the link below.
https://www.smh.com.au/culture/art-and-design/the-world-s-most-unlikely-art-destination-has-created-something-unique-20200211-p53zn2.html

I have been invited to exhibit at the 5th edition of the Dhaka Art Summit (DAS) in Dhaka, Bangladesh curated by Diana Campbell Betancourt. DAS is an international, non-commercial research and exhibition platform for art and architecture related to South Asia. With a core focus on Bangladesh, DAS re-examines how we think about these forms of art in both a regional and an international context. Founded in 2012 by the Samdani Art Foundation – which continues to produce the festival – in collaboration with the Ministry of Cultural Affairs, People’s Republic of Bangladesh, DAS is hosted every two years at the Bangladesh Shilpakala Academy.

My interview was featured on Afropunk online

Newark Museum January Theme: Experience how the body is explored, adorned, and transformed as inspired by the newly reinstalled Arts of Global Africa gallery.

Highlights

• Test your balance in a tightrope walking workshop led by Trenton Circus Squad and inspired by Yinka Shonibare’s “Lady Walking a Tightrope.”
• Wrap your body in your own custom designed African textile print in a workshop led by textile designer and printer, Angela Pilgrim.
• Adorn your head with a hair crown in a workshop led by artist, Adebunmi Gbadebo.